Monthly Archives: September 2009

How many people said “no” to your fundraising appeal?

A classic direct-marketing lesson to remember: If you send a thousand appeal letters, and twenty people say “yes!” with a reply donation, how many said “no”? The answer:  We have absolutely no idea. What led up to the moment your … Continue reading

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Yet another post re: fonts online

Smashing Magazine recently surveyed and compiled a nice cross-section of web site font use — Typographic Design Patterns and Best Practices.   It’s not so much about “best”  as “most commonly used”, but it covers font styles, sizes in headline … Continue reading

Posted in email/internet | Leave a comment

“P.S. You’ll read me.”

Dipping to Siegfried Voegele’s Handbook of Direct Mail once again, some of his thoughts on a letter’s “P.S.” … “If the reader gets down to the signature and discovers a ‘PS’ he does not return immediately to the beginning of … Continue reading

Posted in Mail fundraising | 2 Comments

“100 Incredible Philanthropy Blogs”

Just doing some background research and came across “100 Incredible Philanthropy Blogs.” I haven’t looked through them all yet, of course, but enough to say the list is worth some investigation.  (Now must work harder until happydonors makes the list!)

Posted in Creating for causes | Leave a comment

Fundraising: “Sell the sizzle, not the steak?”

I can’t remember when or where that general advertising “truism” arose, but I’m long tired of if. In direct marketing, though, I still accept a maxim not too distant: Sell benefits, not features. Somehow that makes better sense.   But what … Continue reading

Posted in Creating for causes, Mail fundraising | Leave a comment

The Only Rule

Dale Carnegie: “You’ll have more fun and success when you stop trying to get what you want…” (a donation) “…and start helping other people get what they want.” (a feeling of having accomplished something because they made a gift to … Continue reading

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